The State of the State and a Legislative Review

The Boys’ State Legislature entered its second session with a brief prayer from Chaplin Meckel followed by hearing Governor James Moseman’s State of the State Address. He asserted that the foster care system needed an overhaul, and that young people are shying away from the political process among many other things, hoping to set the tone of the legislative session to come. He presented positive points such as low unemployment and high profits from commodities, but also mentioned negatives such as problems as the low retention rate of Nebraska colleges. Following the governor’s speech, the legislature divided into committees to discuss bills that had been presented; an estimated 96 bills have been given to the legislature so far. Representatives from the Pro Life PAC, the Agriculture PAC, and the Gun Bro’s (sic) discussed bills that they had given to members of the legislature to present.

The Legislature moved to the long awaited General File phase of the legislative process. The first bill that was brought before the body was the Energy Deregulation Act calling for the allowing of private energy companies to provide services to parts of the state that were previously regulated by a public provider. This would’ve been done in hopes that the competition would drive prices down, but the bill was killed. The second bill was a bill outlawing the transportation of Marijuana from Colorado into Nebraska and established a fine for doing so. A couple amendments were added to the bill, but in the end it was killed. A third bill was one advocating for a commission to put those incarcerated for marijuana use to be given other options besides jail-time, in order to relieve prison overcrowding. This bill was passed. The last bill the legislature considered yesterday was one that gave those given life sentences the option to be killed instead. This was the Unicameral’s first day using Parliamentary Procedure, and it was a productive one.

Several bills that made it out of committee were then presented to the general legislature for discussion. Once committees amended and approved their first, second, and third ­priority bills, they were discussed in order first of priority and second by committee number. Bills LB105, LB100, LB99, and LB25. Bills LB105, LB99, and LB25 were tabled; LB100 was filed to select.

On the docket for the Thursday Meeting is LB10, LB69, LB40, and LB102.

The Legislature moved to the long awaited General File phase of the legislative process. The first bill that was brought before the body was the Energy Deregulation Act calling for the allowing of private energy companies to provide services to parts of the state that were previously regulated by a public provider. This would’ve been done in hopes that the competition would drive prices down, but the bill was killed. The second bill was a bill outlawing the transportation of Marijuana from Colorado into Nebraska and established a fine for doing so. A couple amendments were added to the bill, but in the end it was killed. A third bill was one advocating for a commission to put those incarcerated for marijuana use to be given other options besides jail-time, in order to relieve prison overcrowding. This bill was passed. The last bill the legislature considered yesterday was one that gave those given life sentences the option to be killed instead. This was the Unicameral’s first day using Parliamentary Procedure, and it was a productive one.

Judicial Appointments

2016 CORNHUSKER BOYS’ STATE JUDICIAL APPOINTMENTS

Chief Justice

 

Associate Justices

Washington County

Lincoln County

 

District Justices

Wasington County

Lincoln County

Unicameral and How It Works

Monday morning began with a visit from current Nebraska State Senator for the 29th District, Sen. Kate Bolz. Sen. Bolz shared with Boys’ State delegates on the process of bills becoming laws, hurdles and successes of her career, and answered questions about some of the biggest issues facing Nebraska. The former social worker explained how she is passionate about social issues like education and children welfare. She sits on the Appropriations Committee, which has the important task of developing a budget.

Q&A between Gettysburg delegate and Sen. Bolz

Q&A between Gettysburg delegate and Sen. Bolz

Sen. Bolz was generous to spend over an hour on Monday taking questions from the 49 members of Boys’ State Legislature

Photo courtesy of Unicameral Information Office

District 29 State Sen. Kate Bolz; Photo courtesy of Unicameral Information Office

 

 

 

Speaker Lasso Velasco Elected & Legislative Review

While many Boys’ State delegates were busy with school board, city council, and PAC meetings, the 49 new State Senators opened the 76th Cornhusker Boys’ State Legislative session. Many senators wanted to start begin the session with debating of bills, they first needed to elect the Legislative Leadership; the Speaker, Clerk, Sergeant at Arms, and Chaplin. Many individuals expressed interest, shared experiences, and gave reasons on why they should be elected.

The senators have a busy session ahead of themselves as many bills have been submitted already. The first round of committee meetings have already taken place and Wednesday will be the introduction of priority bills on behalf of each committee.

Speaker:                  Juan Lasso Velasco   Yorktown
Clerk:                       Walt Mays                  Valley Forge
Sergeant at Arms:   Patrick Arnold             Belleau Wood
Chaplin:                   Jonathan Meckel        Valley Forge

Legislature_Speaker

Speak Juan Lasso Velasco addresses the members of the Legislature

The 49 Senators are:

Bunker Hill
Valley Forge
Yorktown
Gettysburg
Alamo
Manila Bay
Bataan
Belleau Wood
Curley, Jacob
Cramblitt, Alan
Arendt, Jackson
Azimi, Cameron
Allen, Keenan
Harrison, Chase E
Baack, Austen
Arnold, Patrick
Kammel, Choteau
Mays, Walt
Dack, Alexander
Dravitzki, Zane
Combs, Tate
Hervert, Joe H
Bentz, Ryan
Burns, Dillon
McNeil, Jacob
McNeil, Thomas
Kindopp, Archer
Eggleston, Colten
Eickmeier, Anthony
Lyon, Kevin
Christensen, Gage
Ensz, Colby
Miller, Tyler
McRobert, Seth
Lasso Velasco, Juan
Ridder, Brant
Ochs, Chase
Nitzel, Hudson
Goss, Grant
Horner, John
Smith, Noah
Meckel, Jonathan
Morrissey, Miles
True, Evan
Yungdahl, Ethan
Olberding, Robert D
Lighthart, William
Jones, Dallas
Turner, Abram
Volin, Ryan
Poppe, Andrew
Van Meter, Christopher
Zhu, Andy
Ziebarth, Alec J
Shoff, Cory
Walker, Cordell
Spicka, Nathan

 

What is a Nationalist & Federalist?

What is a Nationalist and Federalist?  Soon, we will know!

Nationalists and Federalists are the two political parties at Cornhusker Boys’ State.  They are NOT Republican, Democrat, Independent, etc.  Each delegate to Boys’ State is randomly assigned a political party.  The two groups will gather, debate, and construct a platform from scratch.  This task generally proves to be challenging and teaches valuable lessons in communication, compromise, and negotiation.

Once the platforms have been formed,  candidates will begin their campaigns for elected office.  Stay tuned for more election results later in the week.

Party Meetings 2

Party Meetings

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